Fresh Off the Press!

By , March 12, 2015 10:20 am

The University of North Georgia Press is pleased to announce our new webpage. Our new webpage and blog can be found here. Thank you for your continual support of our progression and growth!

Papers and Publications: Deadline Extended

By , February 18, 2015 2:20 pm

An update on our undergraduate interdisciplinary journal: we’ve extended the deadline for Papers and Pubs another month due to the winter weather.  You now have until March 24th to submit!

Submission Guidelines

Students may submit original work that has been presented at a conference, showcase, or capstone course either on their own campus or at a regional/national conference site. The work must have been completed while the student was an undergraduate; the student may submit research within a year after graduating. Original research papers are welcome from all departments and disciplines, including fiction, creative non-fiction, works of art and poetry (providing the creative work has been presented at a conference or in a class). The work may not be under consideration by other publications.

Manuscripts should be submitted as Word files. They should be typed, single-spaced, fully justified, with one-inch margins, 12 point Times New Roman font, and numbered pages. Illustrations, tables, and figure legends should be embedded within the text at the locations preferred by the authors. Length: 5,000 words maximum. Citations should be formatted in the most recent editions of the citation style appropriate to their academic disciplines, e.g. MLA, Chicago, APA, etc. The chosen format must be used consistently throughout the manuscript. Submissions must include an abstract of 250 words (maximum) and a student author biography of 300 words (maximum). Append the biography to the manuscript itself.

Authors and mentors must sign and mail the Author Agreement and Faculty Mentor Approval form within two weeks of manuscript submission. Manuscripts and works without an author agreement form will not be reviewed.

For article submission and complete submission guidelines, see: http://digitalcommons.northgeorgia.edu/papersandpubs/

Papers and Pubs: Call for Submissions

By , February 3, 2015 10:00 am

Papers and Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research, an undergraduate journal of UNG with support from the Center of Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities, is currently accepting submissions until February 24th. Submitting to undergraduate journals is a great way to ease yourself into academic publishing; Papers and Pubs is designed specifically for students and recent graduates who want to share their research but aren’t sure how. We realize it can be a difficult and intimidating process, so we use this journal to bring students into the world of research publication in the hope that you will continue to share your future discoveries and insights with the rest of your chosen discipline.

Even if you don’t want a publishing-intensive job (anyone with plans in academia especially needs to learn this process), your college career still requires you to write numerous research papers. This is a chance to put them to good use and show off your hard work.

If this appeals to you—seeing your original ideas printed and distributed to a southeastern audience—then read our submission guidelines below. Again, the deadline for submissions isn’t far away: February 24th. We look forward to working with you.

Submission Guidelines

Students may submit original work that has been presented at a conference, showcase, or capstone course either on their own campus or at a regional/national conference site. The work must have been completed while the student was an undergraduate; the student may submit research within a year after graduating. Original research papers are welcome from all departments and disciplines, including fiction, creative non-fiction, works of art and poetry (providing the creative work has been presented at a conference or in a class). The work may not be under consideration by other publications.

Manuscripts should be submitted as Word files. They should be typed, single-spaced, fully justified, with one-inch margins, 12 point Times New Roman font, and numbered pages. Illustrations, tables, and figure legends should be embedded within the text at the locations preferred by the authors. Length: 5,000 words maximum. Citations should be formatted in the most recent editions of the citation style appropriate to their academic disciplines, e.g. MLA, Chicago, APA, etc. The chosen format must be used consistently throughout the manuscript. Submissions must include an abstract of 250 words (maximum) and a student author biography of 300 words (maximum). Append the biography to the manuscript itself.

Authors and mentors must sign and mail the Author Agreement and Faculty Mentor Approval form within two weeks of manuscript submission. Manuscripts and works without an author agreement form will not be reviewed.

For article submission and complete submission guidelines, see: http://digitalcommons.northgeorgia.edu/papersandpubs/

Working at UPNG: A Semester of Reflection

By , December 11, 2014 1:57 pm

             press picOn my first day at the University Press of North Georgia I felt very lost, very insecure of my abilities. I had never worked at a place that involved my skills as an English major, and the daunting expectation to do well kept growing and growing as I approached the office. But when I stepped inside, I realized that all my worries were for nothing. The press was not a place I had to fear or anticipate. I discovered soon it was a friendly, easy-going, comforting environment, where I could express myself and learn as well.

            Any normal day at the press for me includes research peer reviewing or editing works, writing reader’s reports on submitted titles, or just running errands, but my favorite task is writing the blogs. It’s my dream to be a writer, to express my emotions and opinions through words. I’ve always wanted to start my own personal blog, but sadly I’ve never had the time or opportunity. Writing for the press is almost a dream come true. I get paid to write about things I enjoy sharing with the community including, movie and book reviews, writing tips, and even reflection pieces like this blog. Not only is it a fun way to spend time at work, but it is also a learning experience. My skills improve everyday by writing these blogs, and by reviewing the revised versions, I am able to see both my mistakes and success. Needless to say, I would never accomplish any of this without the help of the editors and other interns.

The more experienced staff members have trained me and guided me through any confusion, and I have learned more editing and grammar skills than I could ever learn from a textbook. I’m the youngest employee, but I’m treated and respected like any other senior employee or editor. Normally, you would think publishing companies go by a hierarchy, and in most cases that might be true. However, at the press that hierarchy blends into a fun work atmosphere, where the staff can be both friends and co-workers

There isn’t a moment of my first semester here the press that I would change. Every day I wake up excited and motivated to work, but none of that enthusiasm would be possible if I worked at bleak and boring publications office. The University Press offers me everything a student could ask for in an internship: support, experience, and laughter; I could not be more thankful for the opportunity. I am looking forward to my future here, and hope to learn more and about publishing as a business while also refining my skills as a writer and editor.

A special thanks to the entire staff for inspiring and pushing me to do my best every day.

 

 

 

12 Days of Holiday Books, Stories, and Poems!

By , December 8, 2014 2:28 pm
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/A_Christmas_Carol#mediaviewer/File:Charles_Dickens-A_Christmas_Carol-Title_page-First_edition_1843.jpg

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/A_Christmas_Carol#mediaviewer/File:Charles_Dickens-A_Christmas_Carol-Title_page-First_edition_1843.jpg

1.  A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
Ebenezer Scrooge, a lonely old miser who spends his Christmas Even counting money, but that night he is visited by three ghosts of the past, present, and future that changes his life forever.
2.  The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry
A humble young married couple wants to exchange Christmas gifts, but they must sacrifice a great deal in order to give to each other.

3.  The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S Lewis
Four children stumble upon an old wardrobe, but inside lies a magical land where winter is always in season and an evil White Witch threatens the land..

4.  The Polar Express
The only children’s book on the list, The Polar Express is a mystical train that leads to North Pole, but only those who believe are able to experience a true Christmas.

5.  The Father Christmas Letters by J.R.R Tolkien
A series of letters written by Father Christmas tell of the misguided adventures of he, his helpers, and a few trusty polar bears across the North Pole.

6.  A Christmas Memory Truman Capote
A simple story of a boy growing up in the 1930’s named Buddy who shares his Christmas memories with his elder cousin, his only friend.

7.  The Christmas Box by Richard Paul Evans
Richard and Keri, a poor disheartened married couple, move in with a lonely elderly woman, Mary, as her caretaker, but when they find a beautiful Christmas box filled with her personal written letters, they learn the true meaning of family.

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_Nutcracker.jpg

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_Nutcracker.jpg

8.  The Nutcracker E.T.A Hoffman
Clara receives a magical Nutcracker that transports her to a world unlike any other, full of coffee, chocolates, candies, and an evil Mouse King.

9.  A Letter from Santa Clause by Mark Twain
In true Twain tradition, the short story is innovative and quirky—sure to make you smirk.

10.  “The Thought Fox” by Ted Hughes
Brew up a cup of coffee or pour a cup of tea and read this little poem as you enjoy the warmth of your place and gaze at the crisp cold outside.

11.  Papa Panov Christmas Story by Leo Tolstoy
The short story about an elderly shoe maker in Russia reflects the need for generosity.

 
12.  “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” by Robert Frost
Fantastic Poem, if you haven’t read it, read it. If you have, read it again.

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